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everywhere in this particular environment. because you have segments of high tech manufacturing. you have segments of innovative financial services. all of those types of businesses in this day and age need skilled productive talent. >> we don't know yet what's going to happen in the state of georgia, whether or not they will follow the lead of arizona and reject the pending legislation. but already we are seeing businesses like delta airlines and others try to distance themselves from what might happen in the state. how important is it for a company like delta to do that? >> well, delta's got a couple of different things at play here. there's lots of choice in airlines, right? and so they're in a very competitive business. they don't want to send the signal that they're aligned with the state, that is particularly unwelcoming or seems to be unwelcoming to certain individuals. and so that would be in the minds i'm sure of the management of delta. >> finally you've been crunching the numbers, doing the retch for a long time -- the research for a long time. more broadly speaking what might
an additional grievance to talk about on social media. theoon as he lost information environment, he began to bleed supporters. when that happened, use on acceleration of the opposition. >> the media's first focused on the terrible and tragic deaths of roughly 78 people in the square but the real story was the loss of political support by virtue of being connected to the internet. >> the me talk about the whole new prize you are offering. explain that. the whole book is about how the internet can solve global problems. how will be a factor in the do come forward to this million dollar prize. i am literally putting my money where my mouth is. >> this is your money. >> this is a personal donation. google is doing things in this area and many are, as well. there are a series of problems -- empowerment of individuals, anti-censorship, illicit trafficking in illicit networks. technologies can be used to make those worse or better. i personally want to fund the people who are trying to make the problems better for citizens. there are plenty of heroes, we want to find them all. look at africa, fo
difficult intelligence environment to operate in after all, the russians have been so sort of nervous about western and in particular american presence in ukraine and other states on their borders. they threw out people from nonprofits and nongovernmental organizations that were providing sort of social support and democratic training and leadership training because they believe that they were age ents of the american government. nothing could be further from the truth. but it tells you something about this being a real tense environment. you go to all your technical means of intelligence. satellite, electronics surveillance. you be sure that all the assets of the u.s. government and our allies around the world are being used to understand military what the order of battle is, exactly what assets they're moving closer and into the crimea. but spider marks is quite right. this is an invasion. it is what it is. and to sort of threaten that in june we won't show up to the g 8 isn't really -- tells you we don't have a lot of leverage over the russian. let's remember the president and the white
, and which prohibited commonsense uses of cheap and safe fuel that could actually help the environment. and department of transportation regulations that, without increasing safety, vastly increased record eping for ready-mix concrete drivers, unnecessarily limited their hours and suppressed their wages. title 2 of the alert act helps to protect people like bob sells and his workers from regulations that ask job creators to achieve the unyou a cheeveble. do not -- the unachievable, do not help to control targets, suppress hours and wages for no good reasons and inundate americans with unnecessary paperwork. title 3 of the alert act offers long-needed help to small business people like carl harris, the vice president and general manager of carl harris company in wichita, kansas. mr. harris is a small homebuilder. every day he has to fight and overcome the fact that government regulations now account for 25% of the final price of a new single-family home. mr. harris participants in small business review panels, existing law uses to try to lower the cost of regulations for small businesse
the boundary. in the political environment we are not likely to return to levels of spending favored by the most ardent defense proponents and organizations like aei on the hill or frankly in the pentagon. now the budget plan announced monday would provide $115 billion more over the next five years then sequester level funding. if it is a realistic puzzle that reflect strategic as well as the resources the department might reasonably expect to receive albeit with strong leadership and cooperation in the congress. if enacted it will help remedy some of the damage article is by sequestration albeit with continued training and maintenance shortfalls in the near term and potential cuts in the future. if the $26 billion provided by the administration's proposed opportunity growth and security fund is also approved for fy2015 the military's near-term readiness picture improves significantly. the budget plan and associated proposals divide a sustainable path towards shaping the force able to protect the nation and fulfill the president's defense strategy. albeit with some additional risk. a
for lebanon's geostrategic environment. if the east and west agree that this must be a peace offul zone because there are important resources here, now actually moving forward on what's the economic value of this, the first thing is to figure out how to get it to market. the market is effectively europe. the original approach was or the plan was certainly to take it over land to turkey which would mean through syria as long as the war there is raging, you cannot do that. but that is the most cost effective i way. and i would indicate that part of the war for syria has to do with who's going to control the future of eastern mediterranean energy. the other way to do it which israel is exploring is whether to do it through lng, you know, whether cyprus and put it on ships or possibly from cyprus an undersea pipeline to turkey and then turkey gets it to market. so it gets into a lot of geopoll to tucks and relations. -- geopoll ticks and relations. if lebanon could get this to market and sell it, that would be -- well, the energy itself, the gas, if it's extracted, the first use of it is di
in school is health practices, their diet, their sleeping and also the school environment that they're in so having a school environment based on caring and respect, one where discipline is equitable and fair and not suspended for things they shouldn't be and rigorous curriculum that's based on high expectations so that means having ap classes and honors classes and enrichment programs at the schools. all help black males to achieve in school. >> james, you contend that charity is not justice and that philanthropy is not policy. what do you mean? >> well, charity is not justice is my quote. i think the question is about scale. i don't disagree with either of our guests here. i think they're right in their assessment of it and starting the conversation but the question for me is about scale and while i appreciate and applaud all of the foundations at the table and the corporations that will come to the table, i think the federal government's got to be at the table to bring to scale the things that ivory's talking about. talking about nutrition in the public school system, if you want to talk
stepped in. >> this is a way of ensuring a warm, welcoming environment judgment-free, so that families can come and relax and have a good time and not worry about how the person on the spectrum is going to behave or what other people might think. >> reporter: lisa is director of accessibility programs of the theater development fund. the nonprofit organization coordinates performances like these four times a year. the mission is to make live theater more accessible to diverse audiences. here are some of the things you'll see at an autism friendly show that you wouldn't see on broadway otherwise. ushers have about 30 extra helpers on hand. they hand out colorful stress relievers called manipulative to help autistic audience members to relax before and during the performance. they make the autism friendly shows as close to the regular shows as possible. audio levels are reduced by about 20% and strobe lights are completely eliminated. yet organizers say it's what's happening offer stage that truly makes this broadway performance unique. the usually empty lobbies are transformed into spaces f
that is part of our environment, utilizing that in a way that generates an electricity and does it in a benign way, is a very strong cornerstone advanced by the president in this effort. also the $4. 2 billion he brings forth to provide for innovation and create new outcomes for energy purposes, not only with efficiency and generation but the transmission of that energy supply and looking at efforts to expand and make permanent the production tax credits that are so important for renewable energy in this country. so those are two good, very valuable investments. let me then just highlight a few others that i believe will be a progress i outcome if we are to accept this notion here in congress. one would be to address the clean energy research program and the president does that with a major down payment for clean energy research, he also addresses the advanced research project agency in the energy capacity, acronymed out at arpa-e. it commits a very laser sharp focus on research as it relates to innovation in the energy sector. will all those outcomes be successful? perhaps not. in fact, the c
environment rich with new vocabulary. >> we use big words in here all the time because we are constantly communicating with them about their day. >> for parents, the cost of sending her here is well worth it. >> we wanted to take money that we might've spent on other things and invested in their education. it is not just education, but it is the sense of socialization, and i think it ultimately gets these kids ahead at a young age. >> that on the other side of town, a world apart, they are doing the dishes together. she has seen a change for the better in her daughter, who has started chatting more. >> before i did not give her the chance to express herself. i would be doing most of the talking. now, i give her a chance to express herself, so she does not get frustrated and angry. >> it has already helped some in their daily lives. i can loves her books, tell you, and hopefully that will help her chances. that brings us to a close, but you can continue watching us on our 24-hour news channel. thanks for watching. >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation,
. the project would be bad for the environment. in january the u.s. state department released a report saying it would have little environmental impact. >> it is moving on a busy highway between houston and dallas, texas after a highway was turned into a ice skating rink. causing gridlock on the 30 mile stretch of the highway for about 16 hours. >> people stuck in their cars for 14 hours. we had people sleep in the parking lot in their cars because there was no place to go. there were no hotel rooms left. >> traffic began moving late last night. law enforcement urging caution and to watch out for the black ice. >> the weather continues to be a big story across the country. the snow may be gone but freezing temperatures they are not. >> another blast of arctic air celting across half of occur ur country. >> the temperatures seeing well below average across the midwest the plains ants into the northeast. that has been a trend for the last several months. the cold arctic blast settling in. the current windchill temperatures as you head out the door this morning staying below zero in the teens in
of markets with a bad the environment for business? >> he is in answering in mandarin chinese. i could tell you what he is saying but you have to wait. you cannot afford to miss it. [ male announcer ] hands were made for playing. legs, for crossing. feet...splashing. better things than the joint pain and swelling of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis. if you're trying to ma, now may be time to ask about xeljanz. xeljz (tofacitinib) is a small pill, not an injection or infusion, for adults with moderate to severe ra for whom methotrexate did not work well. xeljanz can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. seris, sometimes fatal infections and cancers have happened in patients taking xeljanz. don't start xeljanz if you have any infection, unless ok with your doctor. tears in the stomach or intestines, low bod cell counts and higher liver tes and cholesterol levels have happened. your doctor should perform blood tts before you start and while taking xeljanz, and roinely check certain liver tests. tell your doctor if you have been to a region where certain fungal
in that environment was not correcting the problem. it was enhancing the problem. >> reporter: they hemmed to write georgia's juvenile laws. they say they're better off being rehabilitated in their home where rather than being influenced by older hardened offenders. >> what we found out a lot of these children coming into the system were not really bad children. they were doing dumb things. so we wanted to find a better way of treating them under the local level. >> reporter: georgia is following states like texas and louisiana by diverting juveniles to community-based programs. >> runaway or possession of alcohol, rather than having those children detained, is there there are interventions that will happen between the youth and specific state agencies to get to the underlying cause. >> reporter: a new commission is in charge of making sure that the programs are consistent and effective scenario across the s. the state also believes they will save a lot of money in this change. the community based programs the governor said will cut the costs to $3,000 a year. the laws will prevents judges from acc
environment requires us to requirementize and make difficult choices. some we must make now. >> despite the problems and the cost overruns, the military has no plans to scrap the f35. russia and china are developing fighters that will outgun and outfly the u.s. fleet. the question is whether the pentagon can make good on the promise of a jet that can tackle all threats in all conditions. >> the budget proposal calls for retiring the u2 spy plan for one controlled remotely. >> a pregnant woman apparently drove into the water, driving a minnie van with her three children, ages 10, 9 and 3. life guards and other beach goers rushed in. they pulled all for to safety before the van was submerged by the waves. one of the children told rescue areas, "mummy is trying to kill us, please help." the mother was incoherent, uncooperative. she is undergoing psychiatric evaluation, the children have been placed in protective custody. >> tex joons have gone to the polls. greg abbott peat out eight other candidates, facing off against wendy davis. she is the first female nom ni since ann richards in 1994
or the environment. that is an important point to be made. that is the argument being used against keystone. host: he also asked you about unemployment insurance. guest: i am open to that. we offered a bill that we would be really -- we would be willing to support. we put forward alternatives that i have supported and republicans would support. we have to make sure that as we passed legislation we are addressing the deficit and the debt. a 17.2 trillion dollar debt. we have to address that for future generations. to a caller from alaska, anchorage, alaska. patrick, republican line. you are on was senator hoven. caller: good morning. thank you for the washington journal. it is a very valuable resource for us. senator hoven, i have two questions. because of the previous caller, i wanted to clarify one point regarding private and public oil out of alaska. governor hickle saw to it that we became an owner states. much closer to that oil being private oil than it is public. the oil companies appear are telling us that the reason there is only 500,000 barrels a day going down the pipe is because structure
agree that an environment of low rates, low interest rates, especially when it p prevails for a long time, and we have had a long period of low interest rates can give rise to behavior that poses threats to financial stability. and therefore we need to be looking at that very carefully. and we are doing so in a very thorough way, i believe. there are a number of things that we are monitoring. measures of asset prices and whether or not they appear to be diverging from historical norms. namely it's hard but trying to spot any asset price bubbles that might be emerging. we're looking at leverage, which build up in leverage can be very dangerous to the financial system and pose stability risks. we're looking at trends in leverage. we're looking at credit growth to see whether or not that has potentially worrisome trends. in addition to that we're looking the particularly through the stress tests at financial institutions and a low interest rate environment. we have to worry about whether or not they're appropriately dealing with interest rate risk ls. we have been looking at that and, i
the environment and clean water standards is not antigrowth. in fact, it's projobs. when i recently toured the family-run trucking company in my district, they were not against truck safety standards. they do the right thing by their workers and they abide by safe driving rules. and they want regulations to ensure that others do the same. what they are against are new truck safety standards that hinder growth without actually making trucking any safer. smarter regulations should protect good businesses from bad actors. i'll give you another example. denny hudson, he runs sea coast bank, a small community bank in florida. like many small financial institutions, they weathered the financial crisis because they were not involved in the risky financial behavior. they expected mortgages to be repaid on time and they wanted the small businesses they supported to succeed. after the financial crisis of 2008, nearly took down the global economy, most people agreed that government regulators needed to better protect our financial system. but if new regulations keep community banks like sea coast fro
. this keeps -- >> this is holding the environment hostage. >> and we have seen this before where people sit in trees and things like that. look, this keystone pipeline is such a no-brainer, everybody with the exception of the president and these people -- >> unions want it. >> for the jobs created. president obama0s own state department issued a report, gaving it the okay. this has been under study for six years and every single tied study says the environmental impact will be -- transporting the oil and national gas via train, truck, other ways, will actually -- >> you don't want to -- they're not tying themselves to the white house fence, they're loyal and speak for many who are environmental conscious and thigh think this pipeline is nuts. so the president has been delay, delay, delay, keep the union guys happen they might open it up and get the jobs going, and the environmentalists. but you can only wait this out so lodge it's been five years. >> it's ridiculous at this point. every study has come back saying the environmental impact will be minimal. and transcanada will not wait foreve
to their moneys stashed in british banks, that would become a very different russian environment. now they're walking in the streets happy and screaming. you know, ukraine is russia, or crimea is russia. i would like to see russia completely closed. it is not the cold war, but if the borders are closed for other reasons, how popular will putin become with grandiose strategies. >> certainly once you start messing with people's money, they take it very personally. lawrence, a question i had about this is, you know, there are other actors on the world stage who are like in syria, like karzai, who's been particularly difficult. how does the way that president obama handles this situation impact, you know -- iran is another one. what are these world leaders looking for? >> well, i think all of these are interrelated. while we want to penalize putin for doing this, you need his help both in syria and eastern. without the russians putting the sanctions on iran, we would not be at the negotiating table. i think you have to keep these things in mind. your other guests would know this. the soviets c
connell and the staunch opposition to obamacare. >> you know what in a sane environment people do when they have problems with a good objective? they fix the problems. the other choice is to just pout if you're not -- if your pear is not in the white house and make as many problems as you can, stop anything good from happening and if you cane stop it at least bad mouth it. and then when life being what it is and all of us being imperfect as we are, when there's a problem, do everything you can to make sure the problem is never fixed. it may work and get people torn up and mad all the time. but it's a dumb way to run a country. >> so according to the latest poll in kentucky, it's still anybody's race with grimes leading mcconnell. mcconnell's unpopularity may be leading the polls. mitch mcconnell seems anything but worried about the former president campaigning in his home state. he was asked about it yesterday on capitol hill. >> welcome him back. the last time he ran in 1996 he eked out a narrow victory in kentucky while i beat the current gov any by 160,000 votes, 10 points. in 2008 both bill and hilla
is confronting a new regulatory environment, and we have our banks against the wall confronting audit as well as our stockholders. >> right. lou: by the end of the year, what kind of economy here? how much growth? we saw the fourth quarter revise again. what do you think it will be this year? >> i think by the end of the year we're going to be a solid 3%. that kind of assumes that all the pieces fall in to place. lou: yeah. there's that caveat. we appreciate it. greg miller, sun trust. we're delighted to see you. >> my pleasure. >>> up next lou dobbs to be the. we're going hollywood. stay with us. >>> a record-breaking year at the box office films bringing in all-time high 10.9 billion last year, and now they're looking to take home hollywood's top honor sunday. here to break down the top oscar contenders and likely winners is host of the television show -- great to see you. >> great to see you, too. >> let's start with "gravity." i find the movie a fascinating idea. the great stars. does it win best picture? >> it certainly is considered one of the runner of-up for best picture. out in inter
think that that's the environment which we've been in. why are they so low? it's not because there's so much liquidity. it's because there's a lot of fear. the fed is beginning its tapering program but yet this flood of fears has overwhelmed the fed's withdrawal of some of its monthly stimulus. so i think that if we do see yields go too much lower, it's all a question of why, and i think really the reason now is because you'd see a spike in fear, and that wouldn't be a good thing, but again it's the type of thing i think you can just sort of look through and actually think that maybe in a month from now we're going to see that this is actually -- we're on to the next story. >> rates are low because there's no demand for credit. >> i continue to think that rates are low. we've seen this rally in rates this year, 40 bits in the ten-year in two months because investors really are concerned about some sort of repricing of risk and this happened two weeks after the fed tapered. that's not a coincidence. >> there's no demand for credit on the consumer side. >> if you actually look at the cons
few weeks singapore's national environment agency announced wednesday that the country is suffering one of its worst run seasons in history. with every being its driest months since eighteen sixty nine experts say the dry spell friends of race for other food prices and have a negative effect on emerging economies in the region relief may be on the way and seeing sure monsoon season is set to begin at the middle of this month and run through early may. dazzled inter national stories making headlines around the world i'll see you back here tomorrow night. the weather took a step back from spring to winter today here in korea for more let's go over tracking bowed out at the weather center now. well we can take a bite of winter it just yet. about ten centimeters of snow has piled up in the east coast regions although the snow showers have now come to when and what must the late winter wonderland over and helena province as cold wave warning has been issued and the providence college on the dry weather warning so please make it to keep yourself hydrated. we then a senate under the influe
in that environment. a lot of investors aren't used to this market. we think we are in the waning days. as interest rates are eroding those rates of return, you are zero. >> lets the were treasuries ended today. in the last hour, you have seen yields up higher. overall, it was a tight range for the market. they are not taking up very big additions. was a little rush into the treasury market. in terms of commodities, you have to look at oil here. moving on u.s. data, u.s. inventory is climbing for the seventh straight week. there's some weakness in the, the. refining capacity is down. they are transitioning from winter into spring. that affects the energy stocks. or on the markets, i'm alex feel. ♪
, this is a different environment. ukraine's far different. we never got involved militarily in georgia, but there were limited options we had like bringing the best georgian troops back to fight the russians. >> you did have george w. bush face a similar situation. you don't think he should have gone in militarily, aggressively start some war. this president is not doing this. i don't understand how the critique is -- wouldn't you agree the president is handling this situation as it hits his desk right now, appropriately? >> i think we can't go to war. that's very clear. there's no military option here. so i've tried to stand with the administration and say in congress tomorrow we're going to talk about sanctions. eliot's done a good job leading that with ed royce. i think we need to take the fact that america in 2020 will be the leading world energy producer, so let's talk about that being used to be an offset to the russians because their energy is their weapon. if we're looking to make russia a pariah state, that's where the president needs to be talking. >> listen, i think there's a lot to be said
such as entities committed to protecting and preserving our nation's environment natural resources or the communities that could be directly impacted by such activities. to be clear, i strongly support the rights of industry to have an opportunity to provide comments on proposed rules. it fosters more informed quality rulemaking and benefits both business and broader society. indeed, that's why our current administrative procedures mandate that a public comment process be conducted to allow any individual or corporation to participate and provide input and feedback in an equal, fair and open process. that's current law. the amendment that congresswoman duckworth and i are proposing today would simply ensure that all participants in the rulemaking process be provided equal consultation rights with agencies. for example, as the ranking member, mr. cummings, noted earlier, if the u.s. department of agriculture were to have a rule in an effort to protect the health of everyday americans, our amendment would ensure that not only the agribusinesses but also food safety experts, children'
changing the entire arc of their day and creating healthy environments for kids from morning to night. and i think with those small changes we're starting to make some progress. >> reporter: and some of the changes that first lady brought up this week during one of her speeches was that now big chain restaurants are offering more healthy menu, separate menus of healthy option. organizations are planting gardens at schools. she also said that water has now surpassed soda as the most consumed beverage in america. you saw the vice president and the president taking a sip of water at the end of that work out. and so water she says is now surpassing soda. those are some of the changes that the first lady mentions coming out of this four year old campaign. one other bit of news is very young children, obesity rates among very young children 2 to 5 have dropped 43% in the past decade. they are not attributing it directly to the let's move campaign but this is the good news the first lady is hoping we'll see more of. >> i'm sure we'll see more of michele obama dancing with eggplants. athena j
is that these policymakers are making decision necessary a very different growth environment that we've seen in many, many years. people are talking about how the economy is slow and is burdened with debt. there were a lot of questions about the financial sector and the health of it. and the government really doesn't have the same levers that past administrations have had in order to try to stimulate growth. so this is a back drop that they are facing at this time. the big question that people are have here going into this congress is just how will the slowing economy play with those reforms? the government has made big announcements at the end of the last week that we were going to make quite dramatic changes in a chinese contest. but we haven't really seen them walk the talk. that's what investors are going to want to see. they're going to want to see serious efforts in progress for the -- for not only the policies themselves, but also the pace of change. >> thanks so much, eunice. we'll watch for that later on this week. now, the u.s. is bracing for another massive late winter snowstorm, this time taki
. you have comcast in the future trying to get through the regulatory environment eyeing time warner because they want to have a broadband capacity. they want to have the pipes. what is the impact of all this with increasingly video as an important part of what the internet is about? >> we want to have as much competition as we can in infrastructure. we may not have enough. the concerns about time warner and comcast are about who is the competitor. google fiber is present in four cities. we want as much competition as possible. >> how does it work? in my home state, asheville is one of the cities. >> the simple answer is the fiber is run to the poll or the curb and for a small fee, you pay to get it connected. if you want slow speed connectivity which is about five megabits, we will give it to you free for seven years. most people like to pay the roughly equivalent internet connection fees they do today and they get almost one gigabit speed up and down. it is revolutionary. >> in terms they have not seen anything like it. >> the speed is so much greater. are people clamoring for this
you, mr. speaker. i rise today as a member of the sustainable energy and environment coalition to talk about a significant issue for massachusetts and our nation. the wind production tax credit. in the past two years, clean energy jobs in massachusetts have grown by 24%, and are projected to grow another 11% in 2014. thanks to the wind industry, the commonwealth has seen an influx of over 200 -- $200 million in capital investment and is home to nine wind-related manufacturing facilities. massachusetts is also home to the wind technology testing center, which at the time of its opening, was the first facility in the country capable of testing large-scale wind turbine blades up to 300 feet in length. this testing center has created high-skilled jobs and has helped spur the development of next generation blades made here in the united states. we must act now to make sure that these innovative american businesses continue to create new manufacturing opportunities here in the united states. i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting an extension of the wind production tax credit. thank y
nation's infrastructure. he also said i am honored to replace my friend as chair of the environment and public works transportation and infrastructure subcommittee. he will be heading that up. tweeting outffice the president's new competition will help put americans to work by repairing america's infrastructure. is one by the american progress group in washington. everyone billion dollars invested in infrastructure equals 10,000 to 15,000 jobs created. california,ale independent. what do you think? they worriedre about the infrastructure when we have all of these buildings throughout the silicon valley and all throughout a bunch of places in america and none of them are filled with any businesses. they are there and they took up all of this money to build. host: you do not think any more infrastructure spending? caller: i do not think so. host: what about roads and bridges? caller: i think most of the bridges out here are good. we just finished the bay bridge out here a couple months back. it was way out of the ballpark and they should not have spent that much. host: larry, utah, re
to selected researchers and human rights activists in 100 countries. media independence, the environment in which reporters work and transparency, to affect news gathering. this year fin hand, the netherlands and norway lead the list. but the u.s., regarded by many as the world's leading democracy, ranked 46, one rung above haiti. sandy baron questions the low rating for the u.s. >> i think overall american journalists have very powerful protections, not the least of which is the general respect for rule of law in this country. the general respect for free press. >> a lot of people looks at the united states as a model. there need to be some improvements regarding the way the journalists and their associates are able to do their jobs. >> well, in fact some investigative journalists are saying that news gathering is becoming more difficult, especially when it comes to reporting national security issues. tony. >> randall pinkston, thank you. >>> antigay policies in russia is one of the issues, rosalind jordan, before i hack up a lung here. >> people who were protesting against their govern
the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. ♪ ♪ ♪ told ya you could do it. (dad vo) i want her to be safe. so, i taught her what i uld angot her a subaru. irl) piece of cake. ♪ (announcer) love. it's what makes a suru, a subaru. i cthis year aloneore places offi hit new york...ist. and texas! see, hotwire checks the competition's rates every day... so they can guarantee their low hotel prices. ♪ h-o-t-w-i-r-e ♪ hotwire.com >>> if you missed my interview with senator rand paul you can catch it on facebook at okokoko" thank you. i'm shannon bream, this is "the kelly file". >>> welcome to "hannity" tonight, we have a jam-packed edition of the show. america, are you ready? let's roll. >> we are now at a constitutional tipping point in our system. >> a liberal professor tells us why he has turned on the president. >> we have the rise of an uber-presidency. there could be no greater dan r danger. >> the planet has a fever. >> what a founding member of greenpeace says about global warming. >> there is misinforma
to build healthier learning environments for our kids. part of this effort will be eliminating advertisements for unhealthy food and beverages in our schools. thatnk we can all agree our classroom should be healthy places where kids are not bombarded with ads for junk food. food marketing guidelines are tot of the larger effort inspire companies to think about how they campaign for food to kids. kids watch thousands of food advertisements every year. 86% of these ads are for products loaded with sugar and salt. our kids see an average of just one ad a week for healthy products like water, fruits and vegetables. just one. begun the we have first ever white house summit on food advertising to children, asking businesses to stop marketing unhealthy foods to kids and do more to get kids excited about healthy foods. should applynciple to our schools. about theant to talk "let's move" campaign. the federal government's efforts to combat childhood obesity. you can see the numbers on your screen. do you think this is a good idea? isn't an area of the federal area that the federal gover
games were scheduled months ago and not the result of a current environment. it has ukraine officials deeply concerned. not only for the landscape but for the fallout if the ukraine falls out of his sphere of influence under his watch. now tony late in the day here in moscow, the ministry of foreign affairs put out a press release about troop movements inside crimea. they said officially the only troops that have moved inside crimea were tank units that were already there in an effort to secure that region. they say no extra troops have been sent into ukraine. no crossing of border, tony? >> let me ask it this way, phil. are the troop movements now going on inside ukraine being used as a provocation by the russians to get some kind of reaction from this interim government in kiev? >> well, trying to decipher the intentions of the russian government and the russian military can be quite complex. as we saw in 2008 in georgia, russia does use their citizens or their ethnic residents as a reason to inter convenient in neighboring countries. of course, that certainly is not official. but i
regulatory environment, and we have our banks against the wall confronting audit as well as our stockholders. >> rht. lou: by the end of the year, what kind of economy here? how much growth? we saw the fourth quarter revise again. what do you think it will be this year? >> i think by the end of the year we're going to be a solid 3%. that kind of assumes that all the pieces fall in to place. lou: yeah. there's that caveat. we appreciate it. greg miller, sun trust. we're delighted to see you. >> my pleasure. >>> up next lou dobbs to be the. we're going hollywood. stay with us. if you've got copd like me... ...hey breathing's hard. know the feeng? copd includes emphysema and chronic bronitis. spiriva is a oncdailinhaled copd maintenance treatment that helps open my obstructed airways for a full 24 hours. spiriva helps me breathe easier. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva. discuss all medici
of the new media environment. the consumer is a much more in control. you just have to wait to be spoonfed when of the major networks wanted to give you. now there's this rich cornucopia, and your biggest challenge is to sit through the vast array of information available to you. it is there if you want to find it very -- it. the: we're talking about president and his 90 minute conversation with vladimir putin. i think vladimir putin views barack obama? guest: how shall i put this? i think he holds him and minimal high regard. warning sign that he was start taking him lightly was in september 2009. it was september 17. on that fateful day, barack obama made a unilateral decision, without insulting his allies that he was going to and the program that had been developed under the previous administration to build missile defense systems in the czech republic and poland, two of our strongest allies. the czech and polish government had really gone out on a limb and sacrificed a lot of credibility and prestige. their product -- they thought tremendous little battles to get these bases approved c
tomorrrow. and we promise to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. >>> perseverance pays off. texas high school football player michael aramirez threw a hail mary catchi. and he did it. >> of course. showing everybody in class. everybody is high fives. don't forget your real friends. >> promise is a promise. as soon as he asked me, i said yes and so i'm sticking to that. i'm there. >> love it. he plans to wear a red, white and blue texas attitude's dough. >>> are you one of those obamacare, quote, liars? jacob says my rate increased a whopping 42%. daniel says now i have no coverage and running out of prescriptions soon. thank you for sharing. you are real people. that's it for us. fox news sunday is up next. before we go, might not realize it, but the competition for best original song is where a lot of the drama is for many reasons that the year's oscar, but in part because of a buzz surrounding a song that parents and kids everywhere can't get out of their head
of dollars to improve the environment these children are living in and contain malnutrition, that becomes more difficult as new syrian refugees arrive in lebanon everyday. and i'm with al jazeera, the valley in lebanon. >> reporter: al jazeera continues to demand the immediate release of the staff being held in egypt, mohamed fahmy and peter greste and baher mohamed are accused of having links with a terrorist organization and al jazeera rejects the charges and from the arabic channel has been held since august and on hunger strike for more than a month to protest against his imprisonment. bin-laden's son goes on trial and he is the highest part of al-qaeda to be prosecuted in a civilian court and we have more. >> and he was more than bin-laden's son-in-law and he was the top spokesman and saying more attacks was coming and 12 years later he is about to go on trial in new york city, one of the first people allegedly linked to september 11th to face the u.s. justice system and his lawyer says authorities are prosecuting the wrong man. >> he is charged with this conspiracy to murder americ
. >> it will take millions of dollars to improve the environment these children are living in and contain malnutrition. >> becomes more difficult as new syrian refugees arrive in lebanon every day. >>> libya's parliamentary sessions will be moved to a tripoli hotel after the parliament building was attacked on sunday. two members of the general national congress were shot while the security guard was killed. armed former rebels have been surrounding the area. many libyans are angry that they have extended their term in. >> oscar pretorius has pleaded not guilty to the murder of his girlfriend. >> a defense team will try and prove he shot fine camp by mistake. prosecutors say it was premeditated and will seek a life sentence if prestorious is con corrected. >> the hong kong business tycoon and british british football car son-in-law young has been found guilty of five money laundering charges. the owner of birmingham city was found guilty of launchedering $93 million in hong kong >> reporter: he first came to prominence in 2009 when he bought the birmingham football club. in 2011, the club
in that environment. we have learned through a variety of approaches things that we probably didn't expect would be now in front of us this soon. for instance, what are the hereditary factors involved in this disease? it clearly runs in families. we have gone from knowing sort of one risk factor for the late onset type of alzheimer's disease to now depending on who you ask 19 or 20 that we have. that number is growing. in fact, it will be growing rapidly this coming year in part because of the fy-'14 appropriation because we're expanding our ability to do that kind of genetic analysis. we have gone from understanding that amyloid was a player to understanding a lot more about tau and to be able to look at pathways in the brain that are really quite complex and point to other sort of nodes in those pathways that are really important and might be drugable. we have gone from having a few clinical trials focused largely on advanced cases of alzheimer's to what you heard about today, where we now, because we can make the prediction about high risk, start the treatment earlier. just like people have o
. and the idea that we would have created an environment that is hospitable is outrageous. it's not just putin, it's going to be the people's republic of china. even if it's not in cahoots with put putin. >> it seems like the president and the secretary of state keep lecturing putin, that they have a 19th century mentality, this is the 21st century. he made a speech where -- in which he says the great power conflict is a thing of the past. i want to ask you about these words the president uttered many listen to this closely. >> those countries that are large like russia or china, we have the kind of relationship with them we're not getting into conflicts of that sort at least over the last several decades, there's been a recognition that neither country benefits from that kind of great power conflict. the kind of national security threat we're going to confront, their terror threats, they're failed states, the proliferation of deadly weapons. >> it looks like vladimir, when you listen to those words, vladimir didn't get the memo on this, and it seems to me when you add that together with man c
and education issues. the next in line was documentaries about the environment and after that, immigration. we are going to tell you about the grand prize winners this year. it was a team. their topic was called earth first, fracking second. it was a three person team from long beach polytechnic high school. they are served by charter communications. as a three team member in that .roup, >>, michaela, and sarah we are going to be talking with emma right now. you was your reaction when heard you one grand prize? >> we were shocked. we looked across at one another and could not believe it. >> when you finished the documentary, did you have a sense of how good it was? >> we did not. >> how did you get interested in the contest? >> our ninth grade government teacher. how did your team come together? were you able to pick your teams or did the teacher assign them? >> we could pick our team members. we chose other people we have known for a few years. we knew we worked well together. >> when you joined forces with any ofa and sarah, had you done documentaries before? >> no. we watched a lot of video
the planet but that's cool. you're in a region like the middle east where multiproliferation environment where everybody hasn't policy and nobody trusts anyone us. that is the most unstable environment. that was "open range." the hero goes into the town and there are 14 side in town. one person starts shooting and everybody starts shooting everybody else. if you have a nuclear-armed middle east that is the must dangerous situation imaginable. that is the great fear. but i can absolutely tell you that is where we're headed. nobody has a plan to get away from that. these negotiations will not only not stop the nuclear program, they will insure that the next president will have even more difficult challenge keeping iran from going nuclear. that is one of the, the greatest legacy of this administration. sir? >> ross kaminsky from boulder county and lpr 2005. one of the big things we'll hear in the upcoming primary season, john mccain versus rand paul. how should americans think about what foreign engage amentses, what foreign entertaining fellments are actually in our national interests vers
. the next in line were documentaries about the environment. and next after that, immigration. so we are going to tell you about the grand prize winners this year. it was a team. their topic was called earth first, phrack executive. it was a three-person team from long beach polytechnic high school in california. they were served by communication a three team members in that group, emma larson, michaela caps and sir haida check will be talking with one of the three members of the team right now. hi, emma. >> guest: hello. >> host: what was your response when you won grand prize? >> guest: we were shocked. we let that one another and we could not believe it. posta when you finish, to journey sense of how good it was? >> guest: we did not. >> guest: tommy how you got interested in the first place. tesco well, our ninth grade project is required for students to complete. >> host: how did your team come together? did the teacher assign them? >> guest: yes, we could pick our team members. we chose other people we have known for a few years. we were comfortable and that we worked well toge
their bills. this bill provides a commonsense way to protect our environment by setting emissions standards that are actually achieveable. i urge my colleagues to support this bill and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from indiana yields back. the gentleman from kentucky reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. waxman: i yield three minutes to the gentleman from west virginia, mr. rahall. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. rahall: thank you, mr. chairman. i appreciate the ranking member yielding me this time, especially since we do not see eye to eye on this particular piece of legislation. we do see eye to eye on numerous other issues before the congress and the american people, such as protecting the health and safety of our nation's coal miners and our american workers, and indeed, we all, both sides of the aisle, share the common goal of wanting to provide clean water, clean air, and health and safety for our families each and every day of the year. in that sense, we all have that common ground. the
environment with controlled education get there is a wonderful wolved world out there in america. it turned into a question and answer period and there were students asking questions, most of them dealing with agriculture and i was answering them through ed, the interpreter and at a certain point it became too rapid fire and he took it over and took over the conversation. i remember one big-faced kids who said who sets the markets of -- markets for agriculture products? what would be the price for beans, rice, corn, otes and wheats. i answered him that the market sets the prices. how does the market set the prices? there's a buy whore makes the offer, there's a sell whore decides whether or not to take it. if the seller says no, the buyer might decide to raise his price until they get to a place where they agree. that was an amazing concept that it looked like they'd never heard that before. no one sets the prices? how can it be that no one sets the prices? and second thing, how many times -- how often does the price change? it can change hundreds of times a day. it changes every transactio
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